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3 Jakobs torg
Stockholm, Stockholms län, 11152
Sweden

AmCham Sweden is the voice of American business in Sweden. We are champions of US - Swedish trade and investment and US commercial interests in Sweden and give members a networking platform, critical business information, and an amplified voice.

News

Remiss EU-kommissionens förslag om upprättande av ram för granskning av utländska direktinvesteringar

Jacob Dornbos

 
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Utrikesdepartementet (Enheten för internationell handelspolitik och EU:s inre marknad) översänder härmed Europeiska kommissionens förslag till Förordning om inrättande av en ram för granskning av utländska direktinvesteringar i Europeiska Union. Översänder även meddelandet Ett EU som välkomnar utländska direktinvesteringar och som samtidigt skyddar grundläggande intressen, som redogör för det strategiska behovet av förordningen. Förslaget översänds i den engelska originalversionen och i svensk översättning. 

Förslaget presenterades den 13 september 2017 av kommissionen som en del ett åtgärdspaket i syfte att stärka genomförandet av EU:s gemensamma handelspolitik på ett antal områden.

Mer information om förslaget finns på följande länk: http://trade.ec.europa.eu/doclib/press/index.cfm?id=1711

I remissen ligger att regeringen vill ha synpunkter på förslaget. Myndigheter under regeringen är skyldiga att svara på remissen. En myndighet avgör dock på eget ansvar om den har några synpunkter att redovisa i ett svar. Om myndigheten inte har några synpunkter, räcker det att svaret ger besked om detta. För andra remissinstanser innebär remissen en inbjudan att lämna synpunkter. 

Remissvaren ska ha inkommit till Utrikesdepartementet senast den 27 november  2017. Remissinstanserna ombeds inkomma med svaren per e-post till: ud.hiremiss@gov.se med kopia till ud.registrator@regeringskansliet.se. Ange diarienummer UD2017/17122/HI.

Frågor under remisstiden besvaras av Anders Wallberg, se kontaktuppgifter nedan.


Med vänlig hälsning
Anders Wallberg
____________________________________________________

Anders Wallberg
Kansliråd
Policygruppen
Enheten för internationell handelspolitik och EU:s inre marknad (HI)
Utrikesdepartementet
Regeringskansliet
103 39 Stockholm
08 405 92 17
070 206 4290
anders.wallberg@gov.se
www.regeringen.se

2017 10 17 Remissmissiv förslag inrättande av ram för granskning av utländska direktinvesteringar

COM_2017_487_EN_ACTE_f KOM förslag förordning ram för granskning av utländska direktinvesteringar i EU

COM_2017_487_SV_ACTE2_f KOM förslag ram för granskning av direktinvesteringar i EU

COM_2017_494_EN_ACTE_f (2) Meddelande Welcoming FDIs while protecting essential interests

COM_2017_494_SV_ACTE_f Att välkomna utländska direktinvesteringar men samtidigt skydda grundläggande intressen

U.S. Sweden Youth Debates

Randy Gosda

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USA-SWEDEN YOUTH DEBATES

"Sweden has been selected as the host country for this year's USA Youth Debate. USA Youth Debate Inc. is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping U.S. students serve as ambassadors overseas through participation in multi-cultural debate programs. By organizing debate programs, the organization encourages cultural exchange, language learning, and critical thinking.

This year's program will bring U.S. and Swedish students in the ages of 18-25 to a competitive debate tournament in Uppsala and Stockholm on December 4-6. The tournament will include teams from several U.S. universities, Stockholm University, Uppsala University, Stockholm School of Economics, and The Stockholm Debate Society. The event will have five preliminary debates followed by Semifinals and Finals.

SACC-USA and the Embassy of Sweden in Washington D.C. are glad to support the USA Youth Debate Inc. in their search for private sponsors that could assist the U.S. students' participation in this year's program. If your organization or company would be interested in financially assisting a student, please contact the Director of the USA Youth Debate, John S. Tredway at tredway@comcast.net. "

Celebrating 25 Years of Prosperity

Jacob Dornbos

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For the past quarter century, AmCham, the American Chamber of Commerce in Sweden, has been the platform for American business in Sweden. Every day, we focus on promoting trade and investment between Sweden and the United States.

In short, AmCham connects people and businesses to help foster innovation and, ultimately, the creation of shared value. The work we do facilitates and fortifies a relationship that has thrived between the U.S. and Sweden for more than two centuries.

It’s important to reflect on our history together.

On April 3, 1783, Ambassador Extraordinary Gustav Philip Creutz, representing the Kingdom of Sweden, and Benjamin Franklin, Minister Plenipotentiary of the United States of America, signed a Treaty of Amity and Commerce.

Today, according to the Transatlantic Economy Report 2017, U.S. companies invest $25 billion in Sweden, and employ more than 74,000 Swedes. Conversely, Swedish companies invest $47 billion in the U.S. and employ more than more than 210,000 Americans.

The leadership, stewardship and good corporate citizenship of our members has been critical in driving growth in trade and investment between the U.S. and Sweden over the past quarter century that would have left Ambassadors Franklin and Creutz thunderstruck.

The transatlantic relationship is stronger and more important than ever. We hope you will join us to celebrate 25 years of prosperity in American-Swedish trade, investment, and innovation, as well as more than two hundred years of friendship and commerce between Sweden and the U.S. at the Grand Hotel in Stockholm on November 13th.

Privacy Shield: What Successful Transatlantic Cooperation Looks Like

Jacob Dornbos

 
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As data becomes an integral part of our growing global economies, so too does protection of data take priority.

U.S. and EU government officials are convening today in Washington, D.C. to begin the first annual review of the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Framework.  The Privacy Shield is an important viable legal tool that enables the transfer of data cross-border between the United States and the European Union alongside commitments to strong protections for consumers. 

In its first year, the Privacy Shield has significantly contributed to increasing American and European consumer confidence, while allowing businesses large and small alike to provide products and services across the Atlantic.  The EU-U.S. Privacy Shield is successful on many levels:

  • It facilitates the movement of data cross-border for American and European businesses, while meeting the rigorous privacy expectations of American and European consumers.
  • It triggers a thorough review of company’s privacy practices, resulting in demonstrable changes to how they do business and protect consumer privacy, in order to certify.
  • It enhances accountability by establishing a meaningful U.S. government and EU Commission process for addressing any consumer concerns that arise.
  • It ensures timely and swift action in response to consumer privacy concerns, though relatively few companies have received complaints.
  • It is accessible as more than 2,400 American and European companies have been certified, half of which are small and medium sized businesses.
  • It serves more broadly as a model for regulatory cooperation demonstrating that it is possible to find solutions that bridge different regulatory frameworks.

Digital connectivity and corresponding data flows are the lifeblood to the billions of dollars in trade and trillions of dollars in investment that underpin the U.S.-EU economic relationship.  Data flows between the United States and European Union are currently the highest in the world, approximately 50 percent greater than those between the United States and Asia.  And, hundreds of thousands of jobs on both sides of the Atlantic and across all sectors depend on the ability to move cross-border data. 

The Privacy Shield is vitally important for American and European companies to continue to transfer data across the Atlantic and do business and sets a high standard for the protection of consumer data.  It has filled the void of uncertainty following the European Court of Justice’s invalidation of its predecessor, the Safe Harbor Framework.

Over the past year, Privacy Shield-certified companies have shown a commitment to the new obligations in the agreement by enacting necessary changes to ensure strong protections for citizens.  Meanwhile, the U.S. government and European Commission have worked together to implement a lasting agreement with important accountability mechanisms.

Principles for IoT Security

Jacob Dornbos

 
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Future growth predictions for the IoT are staggering. At this inflection point, regulatory philosophy will impact the pace and path of innovation. With a truly global market for the IoT, national boundaries and policy differences threaten to create barriers and walled gardens and distort markets. Governments should support international standards work that harmonizes varied approaches to regulating technology.

Governments are in a difficult position given the complexity and fast changing cyber threat landscape and traditional regulatory responses are inadequate to keep pace with the evolution and economic growth potential of the IoT.

Consumers may not be prepared for their roles in our digital future, in which individual actions can affect communities and enterprises around the world. Basic cyber hygiene education should be prioritized by governments, businesses, and consumers.

Similarly, increased attention is being paid to hardening endpoint security. Here, manufacturers and vendors are leveraging existing industry-developed best practices. They should be encouraged and incentivized to pursue security by design.

Recent cyberattacks like WannaCry, Petya, and Mirai illustrate why a combination of end user education and endpoint security is important. WannaCry and Petya victims used unsupported and unpatched versions of legacy operating systems, which is a lesson in the importance of upgrading and patching devices. Likewise, the Mirai botnet depended on wide-spread use of a common set of credentials, which speaks to use of hardcoded passwords. Governments should proactively collaborate with industry to identify and facilitate voluntary use of best practices.

Given how diffuse and ubiquitous the IoT is, the global effort to enhance security, privacy, and trust requires input from public and private stakeholders. Governments should establish international multi-stakeholder forums for discussion and education about security and privacy regulations, and trust enhancing certification and labeling frameworks.

The IoT is incredibly complex and there is no one-size-fits-all solution to cybersecurity. But the business community looks forward to working with governments to collaboratively create policies that enhance privacy, security, and trust in the IoT based on global, voluntary, consensus, and industry-driven standards.

Ten Key Principles for IoT Security

When it comes to security, attempts to regulate today will become outdated tomorrow. Flexible approaches to collaboration and cooperation to combat shared threats have significant advantages over national regulation which serves to fragment the global economy and lags behind technological innovation.

  1. Any approach to IoT security should be data-driven, based on empirical evidence of a specific harm, and be adaptable both overtime and cross-border.
  2. Security demands should never be used as industrial policy to advance protectionism or favor national economic interests.
  3. National boundaries need not become arbitrary obstacles to the movement of devices or data, or to the offering of IoT-related services.
  4. Global standards work is the best way to promote common approaches and technology solutions. Such standards should be open, transparent, and technology-neutral. 
  5. Any government IoT strategy should promote technical compatibility and interoperability to the maximum extent possible.
  6. Everybody is vulnerable, cyber threats must be met with global informationsharing and collaboration to improve and safeguard the IoT ecosystem.
  7. End users need to be educated about their roles and responsibilities in this digital age.
  8. Manufacturers and vendors should be encouraged to routinely evaluate and improve endpoint security.
  9. The international community must collectively condemn criminal activities that infect and exploit the openness and connectivity of the internet and our digital future.
  10. Governments must work together to shut down illegal activities and bring bad actors to justice.

INTERNSHIP OPPORTUNITY FOR SWEDISH STUDENTS AT THE U.S. FOREIGN COMMERCIAL SERVICE

Randy Gosda

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Internship Opportunity for Swedish Students

The U.S. Foreign Commercial Service at the U.S. Embassy in Stockholm offers excellent opportunity for students to gain real world experience working in both the Embassy and business environments.

About Us

The U.S. Foreign Commercial Service, part of the United States Department of Commerce, is part of a global network of trade professionals supporting U.S. commercial interests around the world. The agency's network includes more than 100 U.S. Export Assistance Centers throughout the U.S. and more than 150 overseas offices located in Embassies and Consulates. Our Stockholm office helps

  1. Promote the export of U.S. goods and services to Sweden/assists Swedish businesses to import goods from the U.S.

  2. Promote Swedish investment in the U.S.

  3. Protect U.S business interests in Sweden

In addition, the U.S. Commercial Service in Stockholm supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Ambassador to Sweden, advises key officers on commercial matters, and facilitates outreach programs for VIP and Congressional delegations.

About the Internship

We offer an intern a dynamic and interesting workplace in a highly international environment with the opportunity for a great variety of tasks and networking opportunities.

Examples of tasks include:

  •   Market analysis

  •   Partner searches and matchmaking

  •   Event coordination

  •   Participation in relevant meetings, seminars and business events

  •   Outreach to Swedish importers and agents, and recruitment to trade fairs in the U.S. and in Europe

  •   Assistance with U.S. trade missions and Congressional delegations

  •   Other administrative duties

The internship is unpaid.

About You

We are seeking an intern fluent in Swedish who ideally has an interest in international business and strong skills in English. You are encouraged to step into our team and make a meaningful, substantive contribution assisting our Commercial Specialists in their work with American and Swedish companies. A successful candidate will be able to work independently, take initiative, use critical and analytical thinking and assume responsibility. We value creativity, open‐mindedness, and a good sense of humor. Students who meet these requirements are encouraged to apply.

Practical Details

The full-time internship (32-40 hours per week) is offered three times a year to 1-2 enrolled students at a time. Deadline for applications: Oct 15 for the spring internship (January –June), March 15 for the summer internship (June – mid-August) and April 15 for the fall internship (mid-August – early January). The Embassy has strict security regulations and you will need to pass a criminal background check to be cleared for an internship. A medical clearance is also necessary.

Please submit your one page application letter in English outlining your interest and qualifications, including CV, grade transcripts, letters of recommendation and the application form (found below) and scan in PDF format to: office.stockholm@trade.gov.

For more information about us, please visit our website www.export.gov/sweden/ and the embassy’s website www.se.usembassy.gov .

Internship Application Form Please complete in English

Basic Information

Full Name (as on passport):

Country or Countries of Citizenship:

Please indicate whether you are dual nationality and/or have permanent residency in another country:

College:

Major:

Expected Graduation Date:

International Experience (please list countries you have lived in or spent more than 1 month in):

English Language level:

Formal score if available:

Swedish Language level:

Formal score if available:

Commitment

Desired Internship dates (start and end dates):

Do you have the ability to work occasional evening events?

Please scan your application in PDF format to office.stockholm@trade.gov, incl the following documents:

  1. A cover letter in English that includes an explanation of why you desire an internship and why you are qualified

  2. CV in English

  3. Grade transcripts (English or Swedish)

  4. Letters of Recommendation, if available (English or Swedish)

  5. This form filled out in English 

Shorten the path to employment

Jacob Dornbos

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"Korta vägen" (Swedish for short cut) at Stockholm University is a labor market training program for university-educated people who are newly arrived in Sweden. One important and very popular part of the program is the internship portion. Korta vägen estimates that a majority of the internship candidates this fall will be ready to present themselves to employers around mid-October. If you and your company are interested in being an important facilitator in a newly arrived individual's career, you can offer a position for an intern. Korta vägen will match your prerequisites and present one or more candidates to you.
 
Reed more here
Contact Korta vägen at kortavagen@su.se.

AmCham Sweden Life Science Working Committee Holds High Level Meeting in Almedalen

Jacob Dornbos

 
 

Life Science is one of Sweden's most innovative venues, and has earned a strong, enviable reputation in international competition. The AmCham Life Science Working Committee is comprised of representatives from some of the most highly regarded Life Science organizations in the world who are taking an active role in driving innovation development in Sweden. The committed companies help to make future innovations possible by being a partner for the Swedish government's work in the Life Science field.

During Almedalen, the AmCham Life Science Working Committee, together with the U.S. Embassy, is taking part in the debate by arranging a high-level meeting with partners, stakeholders and leading decision-makers in Swedish healthcare. The dialogue is being convened to accelerate access to new innovations in healthcare and Life Science in Sweden. James Scheulen of Johns Hopkins Medicine and Anders Lönnberg, the Swedish government's coordinator for Life Science will attend the meeting. The committed companies are: Abbvie, Alere, Amgen, Bristol Myers Squibb, GE, Janssen, MSD, Pfizer, and Quintiles. 

About AmCham Sweden
AmCham Sweden was founded in 1992. The organization has more than 220 members, ranging from start-ups to multinational corporations. The members, representing many different industries, create a dynamic organization for networking and the development and promotion of innovative ideas. AmCham Sweden organizes a number of activities and seminars, and participates in the public debate on key issues. www.amcham.se

Strengthening Partnerships and Engaging Members

Randy Gosda

The past several months have been a blur of activity at AmCham. From traveling around Sweden meeting members in Malmö and Gothenburg, recruiting new members, deepening connections with regional chambers of commerce, and discussing the findings of the annual Transatlantic Economy 2017 report and opportunities to grow trade between Sweden and the United States, to visits to Washington and Brussels to meet with members, policy makers and stakeholders. On top of that we have had more than a dozen AmCham sessions since this spring bringing nearly 600 members together from across our network.

Last month, I travelled to the United States to meet with executives from AmChams in Europe and engage with companies, organizations and key government agencies in order to strengthen partnerships and gain insight into the current U.S. business and political climate, including a series of high-level briefings from administration officials, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and several high-level political experts.

Briefing sessions were hosted by Google, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Hill + Knowlton and the U.S. Department of Commerce. Notably, the annual Transatlantic Reception, hosted by the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, featured keynote remarks by Daniel Mullaney, Assistant U.S. Trade Representative (USTR) for Europe and the Middle East, during which Mr. Mullaney recognized AmCham Sweden for our series of videos promoting the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership Agreement, which the USTR still uses.

Next week in Almedalen, we will be co-hosting Tillsammans Mot Korruption for the third time and America Day, in partnership with the U.S. Embassy. We will also be working with Swedavia again to promote preclearance at Arlanda Airport.

Today the transatlantic relationship is stronger and more important than ever. We hope many of you will be able to join us at some point during our three days of programming July 3-5 as we celebrate trade, innovation, and more than two centuries of friendship and commerce between Sweden and the United States.

You can see an overview of our activities in Almedalen here -- check back often as we will update the page as other activities are finalized.

Hope to see you soon!

P.S. Save the date for our 25th Anniversary Gala - November 13th at the Grand Hotel. You can book tables now, including a special offer for Silver Sponsors.

AmCham Executives Visit Washington DC and Boston

Jacob Dornbos

From May 8 through May 12, executives from AmChams in Europe gathered in the United States to engage with companies, organizations and key government agencies in order to strengthen partnerships and gain insight into the current U.S. business and political climate. Representatives from 33 AmChams participated in the annual conference, which took place in Washington DC and Boston, Massachusetts.
 
Washington DC
In Washington DC, the delegation received timely insights into the new Trump Administration through a series of high-level briefings from administration officials, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, and several leading political experts.
 
Briefing sessions were hosted by Google, Beekeeper Group, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Hill + Knowlton, and the U.S. Department of Commerce.
 
The Washington DC portion of the conference concluded with the annual Transatlantic Reception, hosted by the European Division of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The program featured keynote remarks by Daniel Mullaney, Assistant U.S. Trade Representative for Europe and the Middle East.
 
Boston, Massachusetts
A slightly smaller delegation from 23 AmChams continued on to Boston, visiting some of the region’s most innovative companies and listened to thought leaders from two of the most highly respected universities in the world.
 
The Boston segment began appropriately in the city’s Innovation District with an introduction to the Innovation Ecosystem by representatives from the City of Boston and the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (MOITI).
 
Company visits included stops at Autodesk BUILD, MassChallenge Boston, MassRobotics, IBM Watson, Analog Devices, Linkage and Boston Scientific.
 
University visits included roundtable briefings with Professor Thomas Malone at MIT’s Center for Collective Intelligence as well as Robert Lawrence, Professor of International Trade and Investment Harvard Kennedy School.
 
To cap off a highly successful week, executives had an opportunity to attend a Boston Red Sox baseball game at the legendary Fenway Park courtesy of Dell-EMC.
 
AmChams in Europe wishes to thank the City of Boston, the Department of Commerce, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce - as well as the many companies and organizations who contributed to making this year’s conference a tremendous success.

Transatlantic Digital Economy 2017

Jacob Dornbos

The digital economy is transforming how we live, work, play, travel, interact, and do everything in between. It evokes the image of a seamless global marketplace.

Reality is different. The digital revolution may be global in its reach, but it is uneven in its effects. In the digital world, connections matter. Some countries and continents are connecting more than others, and Europe and the United States are connecting most of all.

Cross-border data flows between the U.S. and Europe are the highest in the world. Digital transformation is becoming the single most important means by which both sides of the Atlantic can reinforce their bonds and position themselves for a world of more diffuse power and intensified competition.

The Transatlantic Digital Economy 2017 is the first study of its kind to measure the digital connections that bind Europe and the United States. It breaks new ground by offering ten metrics by which we can better understand how and why digitalization and digital links across the Atlantic are becoming so critical to both U.S. and European economic health.

Whether through digitally-enabled services, e-commerce, the growing app and bot economy, data flows, social media, or submarine cables criss-crossing the Atlantic, the transatlantic digital economy has quickly become a major force in global commerce. Yet digitization’s not only faces barriers in both Europe and the United States, it also confronts societies on each side of the Atlantic with a host of legal, economic, societal and normative questions.

In the context of today’s debates about jobs, skills, digital divides, privacy, security, competitiveness, and changing economic fortunes, The Transatlantic Digital Economy 2017 provides key facts and figures about the United States and Europe in the digital world, with often counterintuitive connections with important implications for policymakers, business leaders, and local officials.

Download the full report here

AmCham EU position paper on the proposal for a regulation on e-privacy

Jacob Dornbos

The Proposal for a Regulation on Privacy and Electronic Communications (E-Privacy Proposal) Promoting the European data economy: striking the right balance between privacy and innovation

Executive summary

The E-Privacy Proposal (EPR) risks to severely limit the potential of a data-driven digital economy, a key objective of the Digital Single Market (DSM) strategy. If the draft proposal is maintained, full alignment with the General Data Protection Regulation (GPDR) and other existing or upcoming legislation, such as the European Electronic Communications Code (Code) should be ensured. With this in mind, AmCham EU issues a number of recommendations:

  • On the scope, the EPR should remain as closely aligned with the Code as possible. AmCham EU suggests not to include services based on ancillary features and ensure that machine-to-machine (M2M) services are excluded. Furthermore, in line with the intent of the Code, the EPR should clarify that it applies mainly to consumers and micro and small businesses if they so request. Finally, the EPR should define rules only for devices that were placed on the market in the EU. 
  • The EPR should clearly identify the minimum principles and safeguards of due process that should be respected by national legislations on law enforcement access to electronic communications data. Furthermore, any law enforcement access requirements cannot undermine the security and resilience of services.
  • On confidentiality, there is no clear reason why processing of electronic communications should be prohibited or severely limited under the EPR. The processing of electronic communication data should be allowed under the same condition as personal data under Article 6 of the GDPR. The scope of Articles 5 and 6 should be narrowed to focus on the interception of communications by parties other than the ECS provider and authorised third-party partners.
  • On consent for permitted processing, the EPR must refrain from redefining basic concepts of the GDPR. If consent is required, the robust criteria established in the GDPR shall suffice. Additional requirements turning consent into a ‘consent +++’ as outlined in Article 6 of the proposal should not be introduced.
  • Storage and erasure are already adequately addressed by existing GDPR principles of purpose specificity, data minimisation, storage limitation. The GDPR also provides for the right of erasure. Thus, the EPR does not need to introduce additional requirements or restrictions on these specific points. Article 7 unnecessarily increases obstacles to data-centric services and should therefore be deleted. 
  • The rules on terminal equipment, consent and privacy settings are in direct conflict with the GDPR and need significant revision. By targeting methodologies used in specific products and suggesting reoccurring notifications, the proposed rules are neither truly technology-neutral nor future-proof. What has so far been known as the ‘cookie rule’ effectively applies to all types of data that relate to end-users’ devices – hence covering virtually all types of processing operations in the modern world.
  • On security requirements, the EPR now requires ECSs under Art. 17 to inform end-users of security risks that ‘may compromise the security of networks and services’. This is very broad and needs to be further clarified to avoid misinterpretations. The approach in the GDPR is more reasonable and therefore the article should be deleted.

ECJ Ruling on Trade Competence

Jacob Dornbos

 
 

The European Court of Justice issued a landmark ruling on the EU’s competency in trade agreements with direct implications for the Brexit negotiations, among other things. Essentially, the ECJ ruled that the EU has direct and exclusive competency over all aspects of modern trade agreements with two exceptionsnon-direct (portfolio) investments, and investment dispute settlement provisions. Any agreement which includes those aspects of an investment chapter is subject to approval by both the EU and its 38 national and regional parliaments.

On Brexit, while this clearly complicates negotiating an investment agreement, it provides a large measure of certainty that both the Brexit deal itself and a future EU-UK trading arrangement, including one that covers financial services, transport, energy, etc., can be agreed to by the EU and UK governments alone. As Politico put it, “A Brexit deal just got harder. And easier.”

This ruling also has clear implications for other EU trade negotiations (including eventually with the United States).

  • The EU’s FTA with Singapore will have to make its way through all of the national and regional parliaments in order to be fully ratified because it includes investment provisions.
  • It is less likely that the EU will successfully include its Investor Court System in the deal currently under negotiation with Japan. At a minimum, it will lead to calls for an investment treaty to be negotiated separately from the FTA.
  • It remains to be seen whether the EU can successfully maneuver its way through the many minefields to get CETA fully ratified. A more likely scenario is that the agreement is “provisionally applied” for the foreseeable future in all areas save investment protection, which encountered resistance in Wallonia.

Press reports have mostly made this out to be bad news for European trade negotiations. From our perspective, the EU and its trading partners should view this ruling as good news. It is now clear that the Commission has exclusive competency to negotiate in such areas as IPR, transportation, energy and services. Such agreements would only require approval of the European Council and the European Parliament. That gives certainty to the EU’s negotiating partners.  The open question is how the Commission will choose to deal with investment protection measures going forward.

Lastly, and less controversially, on non-direct investments. The reasons for its exemption from EU competency seem to be two-fold. First, portfolio investments aren’t listed as EU prerogatives in the international treaties which form the basis of the EU. Secondly, there are some concerns over state-owned enterprises’ and sovereign wealth funds’ investments into the EU. Therefore, the ECJ elected to reserve the right to oversee non-direct investment to the member states exclusively. It seems that, in the future, the EU can revise its treaties to more fully define investment to prevent the (largely unnecessary) differentiation of direct and non-direct investment.

 

Official Documents:
Press Release announcing the decision
Full Text of the decision

Internship Opportunity for Swedish Students at the U.S. Foreign Commercial Service

Jacob Dornbos

 
 

The U.S. Foreign Commercial Service at the U.S. Embassy in Stockholm offers an excellent opportunity for student interns to gain real world experience working in both the Embassy and business environments.

About Us

The U.S. Foreign Commercial Service, part of the United States Department of Commerce, is part of a global network of trade professionals supporting U.S. commercial interests around the world. The agency's network includes more than 100 U.S. Export Assistance Centers throughout the U.S. and more than 150 overseas offices located in Embassies and Consulates. Our Stockholm office helps:

  1. Promote the export of U.S. goods and services to Sweden/assists Swedish businesses to import goods from the U.S.

  2. Promote Swedish investment in the U.S.

  3. Protect U.S. business interests in Sweden

In addition, the U.S. Commercial Service in Stockholm supports the goals and objectives of the U.S. Ambassador to Sweden, advises key officers on commercial matters, and facilitates outreach programs for VIP and Congressional delegations.

About the Internship

We offer an intern a dynamic and interesting workplace in a highly international environment with the opportunity for a great variety of tasks and networking opportunities. Examples of tasks include:

  • Market analysis
  • Partner searches and matchmaking
  • Event coordination
  • Participation in relevant meetings, seminars and business events
  • Outreach to Swedish importers and agents, and recruitment to trade fairs in the U.S. and in Europe
  • Assistance with U.S. trade missions and Congressional delegations
  • Other administrative duties

The internship is unpaid.

About You

We are seeking an intern who ideally has an interest in international business. You are encouraged to step into our team and make a meaningful, substantive contribution assisting our Commercial Specialists in their work with American and Swedish companies. A successful candidate will be able to work independently, take initiative, use critical and analytical thinking and assume responsibility. Additionally, he or she must speak Swedish fluently as well as have strong skills in English. We value creativity, open‐mindedness, and a good sense of humor. Students who meet these requirements are encouraged to apply.

Practical Details

The full‐time internship (32‐40 hours per week) is offered three times a year to 1‐2 students at a time. The spring internship takes place January –June, the summer internship June – August, and the fall internship August – December/January. Deadline for applications: November for the spring, March for the summer and June 1 for the fall internship.

We look forward to hearing from you, so please contact us at office.stockholm@trade.gov, and we will send you our application form. Your application must also include a one page letter in English outlining your interest and qualifications including CV, grade transcripts, and letters of recommendation. The Embassy has strict security regulations and you will have to pass a criminal background check to be cleared for an internship. A medical clearance is also necessary.

For more information about us, please visit our website www.export.gov/sweden/ and the embassy’s website www.se.usembassy.gov.

Launching the AmCham Sweden Mentoring Program: Gothenburg!

Jacob Dornbos

AmCham Sweden offers an integrated mentoring program in English that is enriched with business skills development, speaker sessions and mentoring by executives in AmCham member companies. Our program is a specifically designed to combine American and Swedish business perspectives in order to help guide young professionals who are interested in advancing toward leadership positions.

We cover topics such as “Habits of High Performers”, “Cultural Intelligence at Work”, “Building your Digital Brand”, and many more, as well as work on our networking and negotiation skills. The speakers and workshop leaders are prominent executives in the network, who are excited to share the wealth of experience they have with our young professionals. 


Early applications accepted starting June 1, 2017
Deadline: September 7, 2017
Program Starts: September 21, 2017 

Brexit and the future EU-UK relationship: The US business view

Jacob Dornbos

AmCham EU is pleased to share with you their comprehensive position paper on Brexit and the future of the EU-UK relationship. It aims to demonstrate the cross-sectoral perspectives of our member companies, provide constructive input to negotiators on both sides of the Channel, and promote a prosperous new EU-UK relationship that best meets the needs of US businesses and citizens in Europe.

 

What's in the paper:

  • Why Brexit matters for US businesses in Europe
  • How we think the negotiations should be conducted
  • Our comprehensive vision for the new EU-UK relationship

Read AmCham EU's Position Here

The EU Single Market: Impact on Member States

Randy Gosda

AmCham EU and ACE member companies experience first-hand the advantages of operating in such a large unified market. The EU Single Market brings tremendous benefits to citizens and businesses.
 
While the Single Market is under pressure as never before, it is crucial to stand up for the achievements of the Single Market and to prevent its unravelling. Fragmentation would be detrimental to Europe’s competitiveness, its influence in a globalised economy and, ultimately, the well-being of its citizens.

Read More

 

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